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Monday, September 22, 2014
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Rums for Summer

sailorjerry



RUMS FOR SUMMER

Rum conjures up the lore of the Carribean. Crystal blue seas, white sands, the deserted and the wild and pirates of course! As our rum selection becomes more a treasure trove with each passing day, we thought to highlight three recent additions that Captain Jack and you might take a fancy to this summer. 

sailorjerry






RUMS FOR SUMMER


Rum conjures up the lore of the Carribean. Crystal blue seas, white sands, the deserted and the wild and pirates of course. As our rum selection becomes more a treasure trove with each passing day, we thought to highlight three recent additions that Captain Jack and you might take a fancy to this summer.



RUM HISTORY


The history of Rum is the history of sugar. One of those is the sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum), a tall, thick grass that has its origins in the islands of present-day Indonesia in the East Indies. Chinese traders spread its cultivation to Asia and on to India. Arabs in turn brought it to the Middle East and North Africa where it came to the attention of Europeans during the Crusades in the 11th century.

As the Spanish and Portuguese began to venture out into the Atlantic Ocean, they planted sugar cane in the Canary and Azore Islands. In 1493 Christopher Columbus picked up cane cuttings from the Canaries while on his second voyage to the Americas and transplanted them to Hispaniola, the island in the Caribbean that is now shared by Haiti and the Dominican Republic. The Caribbean basin proved to have an ideal climate for growing sugar cane, and sugar production quickly spread around the islands.

The insatiable demand in Europe for sugar soon led to the establishment of hundreds of sugar cane plantations and mills in the various English, Spanish, French, Portuguese, and Dutch colonies. These mills crushed the harvested cane and extracted the juice. Boiling this juice caused chunks of crystallized sugar to form. The remaining unsolidified juice was called melazas (from"miel," the Spanish word for honey); in English this became molasses. Molasses is a sticky syrup that still contains a significant amount of sugar. Sugar mill operators soon noticed that when it was mixed with water and left out in the sun it would ferment. By the 1650s this former waste product was being distilled into a spirit. In the English colonies it was called Kill Devil (from its tendency to cause a nasty hangover or its perceived medicinal power, take your choice) or rumbullion (origins uncertain), which was shortened over the years to our modern word Rum. The French render this word as rhum, while the Spanish call it ron.  

Locally, Rum was used as cure-all for many of the aches and pains that afflicted those living in the tropics. Sugar plantation owners also sold it, at discounted prices, to naval ships that were on station in the Caribbean in order to encourage their presence in local waters and thus discourage the attentions of marauding pirates.  This naval-Rum connection introduced Rum to the outside world and by the late 17th century a thriving export trade developed. The British islands shipped Rum to Great Britain (where it was mixed into Rum punches and replaced gin as the dominant spirit in the 18th century) and to the British colonies in North America where it became very popular.

The disruption of trade caused by the American Revolution and the rise of whisky production in North America resulted in the slow decline of Rums dominance as the American national tipple. Rum production in the United States slowly decreased through the 19th century, with the last New England Rum distilleries closing at the advent of National Prohibition in 1920. The famed rumrunners of the Prohibition era were primarily smuggling whiskey into the United States.
 
NEW SELECTIONS AT SUN SINGER

plantationrum PLANTATION GRANDE RESERVE - BARBADOS

"This singular inspiration to marry the flavors and techniques of Caribbean spirits with the mastery of French cognac expertise results in rums that deliver world-class flavor."
~ Robert A. & Robert V. Burr, Rum Examiner, June 2010

A very fine blend of Barbados rums, aged for five years in bourbon casks in the Caribbean then refined in old French oak casks at Château de Bonbonnet. Its succulent nose, typical of the Barbados style, reveals notes of toasted coconut, fudge and oaky vanilla. Plantation Grande Réserve 5 Year Old can be enjoyed straight, on ice or in cocktails.
7fathoms SEVEN FATHOMS - CAYMAN ISLANDS

"Brilliant amber color. Caramelized roasted nut and spicy raisin bread pudding aromas follow through on a round entry to a dryish medium body with a wave of black licorice, coffee candy, and pepper. Finishes with a pleasant spicy mocha, nutshell, metallic mineral ore, and white pepper fade. An interesting ride on a wave of flavors."

Seven Fathoms™ is a Premium Rum hand crafted in small batches at the George Town Harbor distillery. Located in Grand Cayman, the Seven Fathoms Distillery is the first of its kind in the Cayman Islands. Seven Fathoms is truly a unique spirit. It is the first spirit to be made entirely in the Cayman Islands, despite a West Indian history deeply embedded in the rum industries and culture. All Seven Fathoms rum is made using an innovative maturation technique that involves aging the rum underwater!
sailorjerry2
SAILOR JERRY - CARRIBEAN BLEND

Sailor Jerry is a straight-up, no-nonsense rum.We craft the spirit from a selection of rums distilled in the Caribbean. Our master blenders “marry” the rums to our exacting recipe, then infuse it with our one-of-kind mix of spices and other natural flavors, most notably vanilla and a touch of cinnamon.The result is high-quality, old-school spiced rum. An enduring classic, not a fly-by-night fancy.

Nose:Intense vanilla, dry buttery toffee and subtle cinnamon notes
Taste:Warm spices of cinnamon & nutmeg with rich vanilla. A long dry finish balanced with a subdued sweetness and a hint of burnt toffee.

Smoothness is the key to Sailor Jerry's versatility. Enjoy it how you like it — straight, mixed or in a cocktail. 

 

Drop by Sun Singer for a closer look at our legends of the Carribean!